Vaclav Havel Died at 75

Vaclav Havel, the hero of Velvet Revolutions, died at 75 on 18 December 2011, in the last days of the year of uprisings and revolution. The media reported: “Havel became a source of inspiration to Czechs, and to all of Eastern Europe in late 1980s. He went from prisoner to president in 1989, the year the Berlin Wall fell and communism crumbled across the region. Havel died Sunday morning, at his weekend home in the northern Czech Republic. The 75-year-old former chain-smoker had a history of chronic respiratory problems dating back to his time in prison. Havel was the first President of the Czech Republic (19932003). He wrote over 20 plays and numerous non-fiction works, translated internationally”, the media reported. “The end of Czechoslovakia’s totalitarian regime was called the Velvet Revolution because of how smooth the transition seemed: Communism dead in a matter of weeks, without a shot fired. But for Vaclav Havel, it was a moment he helped pay for with decades of suffering and struggle. The dissident playwright spent years in jail but never lost his defiance. ‘His peaceful resistance shook the foundations of an empire, exposed the emptiness of a repressive ideology, and proved that moral leadership is more powerful than any weapon,’ said Obama. ‘He also embodied the aspirations of half a continent that had been cut off by the Iron Curtain, and helped unleash tides of history that led to a united and democratic Europe.’ Lech Walesa, former Polish president and the Nobel Peace Prize-winning founder of the country’s anti-communist Solidarity movement, called Havel ‘a great fighter for the freedom of nations and for democracy. While he was president, the Czech Republic split from Slovakia, but it also made dramatic gains in economic might,’ the media reported.

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“Havel first made a name for himself after the 1968 Soviet-led invasion that crushed the Prague Spring reforms. Havel’s plays were banned as hard-liners installed by Moscow snuffed out every whiff of rebellion. But he continued to write, producing a series of underground essays. One of his best-known essays, ‘The Power of the Powerless,’ was written in 1978. Havel knew that suppression firsthand. He was born Oct. 5, 1936, in Prague, the child of a wealthy family that lost extensive property to communist nationalization in 1948. Because of Havel’s bourgeois history, the Communist regime did not allow Havel to study formally after he had completed his required schooling in 1951. Havel was denied a formal education, eventually earning a degree at night school and starting out in theater as a stagehand. He also studied drama by correspondence. Following the suppression of the Prague Spring in 1968, he was banned from the theatre and became politically active. In those years, he was forced to take a job in a brewery, an experience he wrote about in his play Audience. His political activism began in earnest in January 1977, when he co-authored the human rights manifesto Charter 77, and the cause drew widening attention in the West. His political activities resulted in multiple stays in prison. His longest stay in prison, from June 1979 to January 1984, is documented in Letters to Olga, his late wife. In 1988, thousands of mostly young people marched through central Prague, yelling Havel’s name. Havel’s arrest in January 1989 at another street protest and his subsequent trial generated anger at home and abroad”, the media reported.

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“Pressure for change was so strong that the communists released him in May. That fall, communism began to collapse across Eastern Europe, and in November the Berlin Wall fell. Eight days later, police brutally broke up a demonstration by thousands of Prague students. It was the signal that Havel and his countrymen had awaited. Very soon a broad new opposition movement was founded, and hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets. In three heady weeks, communist rule was broken. On Dec. 29, 1989, Havel was elected Czechoslovakia’s president by the country’s still-communist parliament. In 1992, when it became clear that the Czechoslovak federation was heading for a split, Havel resigned as president, but he remained popular and was elected president of the new Czech Republic. After some years, the serious newspapers questioned his political visions, and the tabloids focused mainly on his private life. Havel left office in 2003, after his second term as Czech president, and one of his greatest political opponents was elected his successor. Havel said: ‘Truth and love must prevail over lies and hatred’. It became his revolutionary motto”, the media reported. Havel said: ‘I am deeply convinced that a fully-fledged democracy cannot exist without responsibility, nor can it exist without the rule of law. Unless a legal system is grounded on moral order, it can neither operate properly nor command respect. (Without this) we will live in an indifferent, demoralized and undemocratic society’. In fact, Havel was a politician who cared about morality and humanity. Havel’s memoir of his experience as President, To the Castle and Back, was published in May 2007.

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The Prague Spring, that was a critical moment in Havel’s life, was a period of political liberalization in Czechoslovakia in 1968. The Prague Spring reforms were an attempt by Dubcek, the Communist leader of Czechoslovakia, to grant additional rights to its citizens. But the Soviets sent thousands of Warsaw Pact troops and tanks to occupy the country. The Warsaw Pact was the Communist version of Nato. In those years, the US and other western countries did not support the Prague Spring and its poor pro-democracy activists, as they did not support other uprisings in the Eastern Europe, like the Hungarian revolution. Some said that it’s a tactic of the cold war. But in the recent years, even the Hollywood makes movies and TV series, like the Company (2007), about the western hypocrisy and western betrayals in the Eastern Europe during the cold war. It’s like the story of our time. The hypocrite western leaders refused to help Iranians and Syrians. They pretended that the brutal dictators in Iran and Syria are enemy of the west, but they did not support the movements against these brutal dictators. But it’s not the whole story. Anyone with eyes open know that the hypocrite western leaders supported these brutal dictators. The hypocrite western leaders, their companies and their media aided the Mullahs and Assad in suppressing and killing the people. They make love with Mullah Mafia and support them. They work with the Mullah embezzlers. They make love with the Mullahs and their families, and also with the Mullah mercenaries and the Mullah TVs in the US and the UK. The stupid western sanctions just hurt the ordinary people who hate the Mullahs and fight against them (If you want to know more about these facts, check our archive). The stupid western sanctions are exactly like the political rhetoric, and its goal is clear: “Deceiving public opinion and the naive people in all around the world”. But the hypocrite western leaders should know all Iranians listen carefully to what they say and what they do. 2010s is not 1970s or 1950s. These days, if you want to be a hypocrite stupid bastard, it has a very high price. Being a hypocrite stupid bastard is a stupid, immoral and inhuman thing, but if you just know money and power, you should know that it has a very high price, too. It’s better you try to be a normal human. Being a hypocrite stupid bastard is just a sign of dreadful foolishness.

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